Pocket Puppets

Sound and Shadow – second performance

Aran Galligan – House of the Rising Sun

For those of you far from Seattle who expressed interest in the Sound and Shadow puppet performance over this last weekend, (Hey Inna!) let me put your curiosity at rest – it went really, really well! And there is a rumour that the theatre records all of the performances that go on there, so you never know, a YouTube link might one day fall of the back of a truck… (There was a bunch of copyrighted music involved, so we’ll have to see if we can get it online, and then how long it lasts once uploaded…)

 

Monday – Gun Day

More events from the 1st of Jan, 2017, from the Gun Violence Archive

No time for a deep dive today, so just a quick pair of guns:

Eighteen year old Kiara Tatum was killed when a man and a boy fired into a crowd standing outside in Memphis, TN, at about 8pm, from their vehicle. One report said that:

According to Memphis Police Department, 22-year-old Devante Robinson is accused of being one of two people inside a white car that fired shots at a crowd of people on Danville Circle. Kiara Tatum, 18, was killed in the shooting.

The other suspect was identified Tuesday as 17-year-old Jaylen Clayton.

Robinson is charged with first-degree murder, five counts of attempted first-degree murder, and using a gun during a felony.

An earlier report said that:

Clayton is charged with first-degree murder, five counts of attempted first-degree murder, and using a firearm during a felony.

Robinson was out on bond for reckless endangerment at the time, having been in another vehicle from which shots were fired (at children playing outside,) less than a week earlier. And as for Clayton, one of the latest articles I found said that the 17 year old was to be tried as an adult.

Between everything I read, a lot of weapons and ammunition were mentioned, but none named. Amazingly with two guns fired, and reportedly up to five other victims, Tatum was the only one found dead from a gunshot wound.  We’re up to DP 2 yet again, but I’ll add DP1 too, since the exact killer will probably go unidentified.

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P
Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

 

to put into your eyes

Shows and books with jewels, oh my!

Screen capture of the Making Out Mark online tour

A couple of things to get close to your face and take in:

This is the last weekend for the Pratt Teaching Artists show Making Our Mark at the Bellevue Arts Museum. If you can’t get there in physical form, you can take this excellent online 3D tour. Now there’s some words I never thought I’d form into a sentence.. It’s a fun show, and the 3d-tour is a great way to experience it.

P 52-53 of SNAG Jams 2018.
Bethany Laranda Wood – Look-out, Look-in, 2017
Laurel Fulton – Collectors Notes, 2017
Melissa Cameron – My House – Tanya Lippe’s Lunch Box, 2016
Al photos by the artists

SNAG JaMS – the Society of North American Goldsmiths have put together a book of the best-of jewellery and metals for the ending September 2017. It’s really beautifully produced – kudos to the designers and Marissa Saneholtz, the editor, as well as the SNAG board who brought it into fruition. It’s an idea borrowed from the New Glass Review, made annually by the Corning Museum of Glass, that documents the most exceptional works in our field from the year just passed. Like that publication, it will hopefully grow into an indispensable record of the best and brightest in our field, and be read by generations to come. The production values certainly speak to that aspiration.

Check out this years edition via that first link above, and be sure to get prepared to make your submission later this year.

Seattle – Enamel Classs

THIS WEEKEND! And one in June…

Image of a Resist neckpiece (that spells ‘resist’ in binary) in stainless steel and vitreous enamel.

Come hang out and do some Liquid Enamel for Steel and Copper with me at Pratt in Seattle this weekend! Why? Because enamel on steel is a unique process in the enamel world, and I’m not bad at it – see above* –  and, because opportunities to come spend time playing with me in the mighty USA are quickly running out.

I already put this news out on the socials (look at me, writing like the kids talk), so apologies for the duplication, and also I’m sorry if this is brand new to you, (it may not be the most sympathetic forum to tell y’all) but… We’re moving back to Australia in October.

Which makes this the second last opportunity that US folk have to join in a workshop with me while I’m still a full-time resident. I absolutely intend to come back and visit everyone, but getting working visas and employment authorization have only become more difficult the longer I have lived here, so who knows when I’ll be able to do this again.

The final weekend workshop I have scheduled is on the weekend of the 16th-17th of June at Danaca Design in the U district of Seattle. There we’re going to concentrate on Enameling Recycled Steel for Jewelry. That class will be some of the same, but also a little different since we’re going to walk the neighbourhood to find some of our materials on the street – basically duplicating how I tend to live my life. I’ve been working up the courage to take this risk with a whole class for a while, so I hope I’ll have a few courageous souls who’ll be interested in trying it out with me 😉

But same goes for this weekend! If you’re in the area and have ever thought “Hmm, an enamel class sounds good, but I have to do my Spring cleaning – I’ll get the next one”, maybe… you know..

 

*Enameling and firing steel chain has some quirks, so there’s a few tricks and tips that I’ve figured out in my practice that I’ll be sharing. And of course it comes along with all the usual info, much of which crosses over into all forms of enameling.

Monday – Gun Day

Yeah, it’s simply depressing. Gun violence, from every angle, is horrifying.

I don’t have a lot of light for y’all as an opener this week, I’ve been trying to keep my thoughts away from the fact that I still have a few more of these Mondays ahead of me. I’m ok, and you can skip this, so let’s press on.

///

Our first victim this week is 83 year old Choyce Moon, found killed in his home in Dallas, Texas, around 12 noon on January 1st, 2017.

A man has been arrested for the New Year’s Day murder of his 83-year-old father and for injuring his 80-year-old mother.

Choyce Moon, 83, was found murdered inside his South Dallas home on Redbird Lane Sunday morning, and his 80-year-old wife Mae Francis Moon was seriously injured.

Their son Donald Moon, 55, was arrested Jan. 4 near downtown Dallas. He has a lengthy criminal record, mainly with charges of family violence. He was released in March from state prison after serving time for a conviction.

In another article I found, Donald Moon confessed that he did it on the 30th of December, and that his parents were found only after a neighbours noticed uncollected newspapers and called the police for a welfare check. That turned up the dead man in a chair in the lounge room, and wounded woman in her bedroom. This article also claims that it was knife wounds that killed the father, and that Mae Moon was stabbed when trying to come between the pair in an argument.

So. There’s no record of the gun used in this sorry crime, in fact, I’m starting to question if a gun was used. I’m wary of overriding the Gun Violence Archive, and the news source they quote says the woman was ‘shot’, but the police are reported as using ‘homicidal violence’ as Choyce Moon’s cause of death in that article (and others.) The eventual confession (quoted here) says that Donald Moon attacked his parents with a knife on the 30th of December.

I’m not going to make a call on anything other than the date. I have had qualms on a previous Archive listing, for a man that was found shot, on the 1st, but that had been missing for weeks. This time I have more evidence to say that the murder happened before the date claimed, and a question over the fact that it was violence that involved a gun at all, so I’m still mulling over if I’m going to include the Moon family incident in my work. I don’t think that I can. It might seem strange, since my date choice was almost arbitrary, but one day of gun violence is one day of gun violence. And if the violence did not fall on that day…

I’ll let you know, but I think my Choyce Joseph Moon commemoration ends here.

\\\

A fifteen year old boy, Sean Crizer shot and killed sixteen year old Charlotte Zaremba in her bedroom around 2am on New Years Day in Ellicott City, Howard County, Maryland. Upon hearing a scuffle in her daughter’s room, Suzanne Zaremba, who had just returned from picking her daughter up from a New Years party, entered the room to find the masked boy, who shot her daughter, then her in the leg, and then himself as she, a registered nurse, and her husband, also a registered nurse, performed CPR on Charlotte. Suzanne survived while Crizer died later in hospital.

The boy was later implicated in two prior burglaries in the area surrounding Howard High School, the neighbourhood in which he and the Zaremba’s lived, and it was found that in one of them the gun was stolen which he used to kill Charlotte, and himself.

It was reported that the police found no close friendship or relationship between the girl and the shooter, even after going through their cellphone and computer data, though the Washington Post reported that a friend knew that he had asked her to homecoming. Her response had been that she did not reciprocate the feelings that he had, and that she was going with friends. We left off at DP 1 last week, so we’re up to DP2.

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

I’ve had a case of a moving target, so to speak, in the ledger that I’ve been pursuing on the Gun Violence Archive. On the day I downloaded the listing I’ve been referring and gradually adding extra data to, in Excel format, this incident was placed at #45, and in the months that it’s taken me to comb through the associated linked pages from the main 3 pages that catalogue January 1 on the internet version of the archive, the incident was moved from page 2 to page 3. (I have a feeling that the location was slightly shifted, from the original report that listed Richmond, to Prince George, also in Virginia.)

I’m going to put in where I first saw it, here, but from now on if you look to the archive, you will see that it is out of sync with my listing. I’m sorry about that, but I’m going to preserve my original record.

With that squared away, the incident itself is unusual, (at least accounting for those I’ve written of thus far,) in that it is a suicide. As per the GVA:

Suicides

Because of the way Law Enforcement and Coroners report suicides, they cannot be collected in near real time so they DO NOT appear on our Daily Summary Ledger. They ARE added to our End of Year totals in AGGREGATE when they become available.

So if the GVA don’t tend to add suicides to the individual counts (link to their methodology), I’m led to think that it’s because this was a judge, who shot himself in his office, the extra media attention it garnered made it a necessary inclusion in the list. Judge Nathan Curtis Lee (60), on the evening of January first, suffered an intraoral wound according to “Jeanette Collins, district administrator with the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Richmond.” (Source) The death was ruled a suicide. DP1

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

Jermaine Anderson Spearman died on Wednesday the 4th of January after being shot around 5pm on January 1st.

Spearman was a passenger in a gold Honda Accord when an unknown suspect fired a shot into the car.

I found very little else about this crime, but it really sticks out to me that we know the brand and colour of the vehicle he was in, but not even the caliber of the round that struck him in the neck, creating the wound that would later kill him. DP 2

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

Robert Ward, 43, was killed inside his home allegedly by by Miles Richardson Holt (18) and Jonathon Kyle Elliot (20). As Ward’s son tells it;

“Someone was banging on the door at 10 o’clock at night,” said Jordan Ward, one of Robert Ward’s sons. “He went and grabbed a shotgun and went to see what it was. About the time he walked into the living room, whoever it was started firing at the windows and shot the house and my dad didn’t survive.”

A different son, 11 years old, hid under his bed, then after it went quiet and his dad didn’t respond, he called 911. No details about the guns, so one each for Elliott and Holt. DP 1 + 2

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1
Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

Reported by the Chicago Tribune:

On the West Side just before 5:55 a.m., a 39-year-old man was shot to death in the West Garfield Park neighborhood. He was identified as John Warship, of the 4400 block of West Wilcox Street, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office.

Officers found Warship on the sidewalk in the 4600 block of West Monroe Street after responding to a call of shots fired. He had been shot multiple times and was pronounced dead at the scene at 6:10 a.m.

As a person who died from gunshot wounds in Chicago over a violent New Years weekend, Warship’s story got a lot of attention, but none of it mentioned a weapon, a suspect, or a motive. DP1

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

Twenty-two year old Maryann Nabil Rosail was in a parked car with three other people when a gun accidentally discharged, shooting her in the side. She died later in hospital. Despite it being ruled a homicide, no charges appear to have been made. Rosail was in the car with her female friend, and two males they had met at a New Years Eve party. No gun details. DP2

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

Korrey Miller (41) appears to have been shot to death by someone known to him. He was killed in his home in North St Louis County, MO, after a disturbance. Once again, there are many articles that each repeat the same scant information about this case, and as such the gun is unknown. DP1

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

Yes, I’m getting tired of these too. Lucky for us, there’s only 12 incidents left to discuss for 1 January 2017.

Puppet Show!

Puppet aficionados and jewellery fans unite in this one-night-only shadowy storytelling extravaganza!

Show Description – Three jewelers, after years of honing their precision jewelry making skills, delve into shadow puppetry. With an attention to detail, Kirk Lang, Aran Galligan and Melissa Cameron will tell stories through sound and shadows. Music interludes by acoustic singer-songwriter Aaron J. Shay, whose music blends an old-world folk sound with a modern lyrical style.

Pocket Theater
8312 Greenwood Ave N, Seattle, WA 98103

Tickets available now, $10 presale, $14 on the door. The money is going to the guy with real talent – the musician!

Yes, they let grown-ass adults take over a theatre for an afternoon to play with their paper toys behind a screen and in front of a bright light. What can I say, some of us have really got game! (No really, we see you, Aran.) Come along, we can play in the dark together 😉

The Enamelist Society Newsletter

I warned you, (did I not warn you?) that I was going to take over the world?

Yes, you read right, I am now in charge of Global Enamel News. [GEN]

Should I be in charge of GEN? No, no I shouldn’t be in charge of GEN, but this is the current world order, and so we’re all going to make do, as best we can. On that note – I NEED MORE NEWS!

But before I really start to beg, lets have a quick debrief of what have we learned since last time;

1/ the deadline that I have to deliver my email listicle to The Enamelist Society [T.E.S.] news desk (what they choose to then call my listicle is their business, you hear… much in the same way that I, just then, made up that they have a news desk – see, two can play at this game, T.E.S…) is about 2 months before the new issue of the T.E.S. newsletter will hit inboxes. Ya dig? I’m going to need as much warning as you can give me.

2/ some links make it intact through the vagaries of publication, some don’t. Next time I will endeavour to make the links small enough that they remain click-able despite the PDF-ing process. If you can give me a shorter link, I’ll gladly take it.

3/ T.E.S is not afraid to publish material that is post-current. I’ll still pass it on, if you give it to me, so I guess it’s up to you if you want to read old news. Do with that intelligence what you will.

4/ I am clearly not afraid to fill my allotted space with self promotion. (I’d have said shameless, if I could say felt no shame, but hey, raised in organised religion, what choice do I got?) PUH-LEASE give me something else to work with. Please! I’m pleading, and that’s awfully close to begging, yeah?

OK, I WILL BEG. *if you don’t mind, picture me on my knees, right next to you, right now, pouting and wailing in a cracking voice*

“MORE

INPUT

PLEASE!”

It’s quite simple. JUST SEND ME YOUR ENAMEL EXHIBITIONS. NEWS. JUICY TIDBITS. OBSERVATIONS. ANYTHING! and you can stop this pitiful sight.

We’re collaborating here, people! So please let me know, and I will, in turn, pass it on to the rest of the globe, as is my (new) remit.

enamel (at) melissacameron (dot) net          😉

xx m

PS – next deadline, April 29, the one after that, July 30.

Monday – Gun Day

The half-way point of incidents of Jan 1st, 2017 is only visible in the rear view mirror. Small mercies.

Amongst other things, I’m reading The Gunning of America: Business and the Making of American Gun Culture by Pamela Haag, that I stumbled across in the Queen Anne branch of the Seattle Public Library. (A quick cheers for the humble public library.)

I wrote this quote down, not because it’s particularly relevant to what I’m researching, but owing to what I do, and really, who I am, it was very ‘sticky’.

P7: “Here, on the cusp of its demise, gunsmithing entered a golden age of craftsmanship. Gunmaking was similar to the high-end crafts of silversmithing and goldsmithing, clock-making and pewter works.”

That cusp was brought about by the opening of US government small arms manufacturers at Harpers Ferry and Springfield Armory (not to be confused with the much later Springfield Armory, Inc.), in the late 1700’s, which soon brought with it machine production/mass production of weapons for the US military. And as with most of the industrial revolution, mass production of small arms and ammunition spelled the end for the individual gunsmith. It’s interesting, especially in a series exploring the horrific outcomes of gun use, to think of guns before mass production and commoditization. When guns were hand made (and not always that well) for individuals, and parts were not interchangeable, making repairs as idiosyncratic as the weapons themselves.

Which, strangely, reminds me of this Beretta ad from a few years back that looks like a short film (actually, that’s how it was marketed.) I remember thinking at the time that they were really pushing hard on the craft angle to create desire for this object. I found, and still find, parts of it quite discomfiting,  because of its blatant appeal to my craft/artistic sensibilities – it’s seductively produced, and the weapon is being made with great craft ability, and seemingly, great care. That said, seeing it again now only just outside of the time period in which it was produced, there are several parts that would be laugh-inducing – if not for the actual object being so carefully stage-managed through it’s “production”.

/ / /  Back to the purpose of this post, and for the gun-spotters, incidents 38 – 42 netted no new guns being entered into my drawing archive today.

Tyler Matthew Balais (25) was shot with a hand gun by girlfriend  Kassandra Lorrenne Imbert (22) around 12:40am on the 1st.

From the Herald and News:

The pair had been drinking at a local downtown bar New Year’s Eve when they got into a fight. At one point Balais had locked Imbert out of their home at 617 High St. She later got in and was taking down Christmas decorations when he went upstairs and pulled out a pistol, threatening to kill himself, according to testimony. He and Imbert wrestled with the gun and it went off, shooting him in the head.

The bullet was found lodged in the ceiling, according to Imbert’s defense attorney, Mark Costello.

It was not the first time Balais had threatened suicide. In almost the same circumstances, he had been fighting with a former girlfriend and they had wrestled over the same gun. It went off, but no one was injured, Costello said.

In September Imbert eventually pled no contest to negligently causing his death and received a sentence of five years probation. As to reports, it was a handgun – and we’re up default Pistol 1.

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

Christian Rosales (21), was shot when leaving a New Years party with friends around 2am. From KSBW8:

A man approached them asking for change for a $20. When the group said they didn’t have change, the man aimed a gun and replied, “Well that’s too bad homies cause you gotta give me everything you got,” Torres said his brother recalled. “He was pointing the gun at everyone.”

Rosales attempted to overpower the gunman to protect his friends, Torres said.

Rosales was shot once in the stomach, and died at the scene. The gunman fled.

“His courage saved my brother. He’s a hero,” Torres said.

Salinas police Cmdr. Stan Cooper said no suspects have been identified in the killing, and no arrests were made. Cooper said some witnesses have come forward.

DP2

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

Alonzo Cortez  (22) was hit by celebratory fire at about 12:15am on New Years Day. He was taken off life support at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital on Monday at 5:11pm. Officers investigating at the scene noted many people firing as well as fireworks going off well into the morning. Colquitt County Sheriff’s Office Inv. Chris Robinson said “We have no idea where it came from or what caliber.” This is our second accidental death after celebratory fire.

We’re back to Default Pistol one.

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

There is really little known about the next double murder, other than that father and son were shot within minutes of one another outside their dwelling, and that neighbours didn’t react as quickly to the gunfire as they might have because they were used to hearing gunshots on New Years. Lavar Edwards, 39 and Dejuan Davis, 21 were shot at about 4am, soon after which Edwards was seen running back towards his home, bleeding profusely. Both died from their wounds. DP 2

 

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

Another one from the Archive with precious little detail. The Vernon Parish Sheriff’s Office responded to a call from Anacoco made around 7pm on New Years Day. They discovered Calvin Stubbs, aged 30, and Norma Ross, aged 48, both dead, who witnesses told them were shot by Derrick Ross (36), Norma’s nephew. Derrick was later found dead near the property, from what the Coroner’s Office determined was a self-inflicted gun shot wound. DP1

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

Exhibitions – Seattle and Taipei

See some of my works at a couple of new shows opening in the next few weeks!

ryan james fine arts: Visual Impressions

And yes! I will be in Kirkland for the opening reception on the 12th of April from 5pm. Please come along and say hi!​

The second is a huge international enamel art exhibition organised by National Taiwan Craft Research and Development Institute,
Chinese Taipei Enamel of Art Association

2018 Blaze: International Art Enamel

April 19th (Thursday) to August 19th (Sunday), 2018
National Taiwan Craft Research and Development Institute Taipei Branch 4 Floor (41, Nanhai Road, Zhongzheng District, Taipei City, Taiwan 100)

DANGERR

A Design Competition with Designs Aiming for a New #GunSense Emphasis on Regulations & Reform

And while we’re on the subject of Boris Bally, he’s organising a design competition to raise money for the The Rhode Island Coalition Against Gun Violence (RICAGV), which was founded in 2013 after the Sandy Hook Shooting. If you’re nowhere near being able to see Boris speak, perhaps you’d like to help out his cause by getting involved with this.

From the website:
(for the full competition details, click through)

The Competition:
We are looking for bold, affordable works of wearable, useable or decorative art to further an awareness of the gun violence epidemic we still face.  We hope to promote conversations that spark debate while providing needed resources to support real action including a planned gun amnesty/buy-back organized by artist Scott Lapham.  The competition will also support the RICAGV’s continued advocacy for responsible gun laws.

Designers, artists and metalsmiths are intrigued by material, technique and the challenges presented by engineering obstacles. Not only do they shape objects for wear, use and decoration but also for political commentary. The goal of this competition is to showcase, promote and sell the best designs which may employ an arsenal of wit and skill to transform weapon imagery beyond its deadly intent.  The winning entries will ultimately support the entrants as well as the efforts of the RICAGV.

Criteria for selected work:
Jury will consider overall design originality, skill, impact and production feasibility.  The design’s ability to convey the mission of the RICAGV will be crucial.

Jury:
A group of nationally recognized Jurors will select the final pieces to be placed into production:

Emily Zilber                Editor, Metalsmith magazine, Independent Curator
Dominic Molon         Richard Brown Baker Curator of Contemporary Art,
RISD Museum
Linda Finn                    Executive Director, RICAGV
Peter Diepenbrock    Sculptor, Designer
Boris Bally                    Metalsmith, Organizer

First Place Award:
The Top Award will receive a purchase order from RICAGV for the purchase of twenty units at their maximum wholesale cost of $100 (value up to $2,000).

Finalist Awards:
The RICAGV will initially purchase the original prototype entries from each of the finalist’s jury-selected designs.  The designs will remain the property of the designer with the stipulation that the RICAGV may promote and sell these designs. These top designs will be professionally photographed and promoted on the RICAGV website, in mailings and at events using the designer’s name in all promotions. These selected designs will be offered for retail sale to the public by the RICAGV and their affiliated locations.  As orders are received, they will be turned over to the artist for timely production.  The RICAGV will in turn fulfill orders directly to the customer. Artists will receive their wholesale price and RICAGV will receive the balance to support their ongoing work.

The Jury reserves the right to pick as many design finalists as they wish.

 

Get to it, creative activists!