spotto

Melissa makes omission in plans, corrects at the bench, carries on.

So, who noticed the deliberate* mistake in the plans? Well if you did, write to me to claim your prize!

After adhering print-outs of the plans to the spoons, I cut out spoon one (as laid out pre-assembly above, with spoon two similarly arranged below it) and then drilled and began to cut into spoon two. And in the second round of saw-peircing, I noticed that the circuit that I was seperating from the main body of the spoon had no holes marked on the drawing, and therefore no holes drilled through the piece. By then it should have had both. So I got out the old texta, marked eight appropriate spots, and went back to the drill press.

*deliberate = complete, absent-minded omission

1 tsp

Melissa shows off a work in progress – a spoon she’s about to make useless, by turning it into art…

Exhibit A –  a teaspoon.

Hand Held Gallery is having a show in April called ‘one cup’. It takes 48 teaspoons to make up a cup, says Megan at the gallery (I’m sure it’s true, Megan doesn’t seem the type to make up such a fact, or any fact, in fact). I am currently working on a pair of them, and they both started out looking like this.

discussion

Melissa today is talking about talking about jewellery. Got it?

Been doing some jewellery-exercise. A few sedate the rounds of the intertubes (there’s a public holiday in many parts of Australia today) looking at competitions that have wended their way to my inbox. Through one I found out that Damian Skinner is now writing the Art Jewelry Forum blog, for the US based AJF. And via a post by him, I landed on a documentary called Jewellery Talk made in 2006 by two Swedes, Daniela Hedman and Kajsa Lindberg. The premise is simple, and would have made for one amazing road trip. Get a bunch of formidable artist-jewellery heads on film responding to some probing questions about jewellery. At a little under 50 minutes, it does take a little time to get through, but it’s well worth wading right on in.

The whole premise reminds me a little of doing a winery tour, to the point that I’m conjuring images of James May’s latest tv series as well as the film, Sideways, from a few years back. These images are just popping into my head, as my brain rifles around the ‘ole filing system thrusting catalogue cards into the air, seeking a way to frame what I just saw.

It’s like going to see the makers and sellers of wine, on their soil, to ask them about the importance of their product. Obviously the answers vary. Makers respond on their own brand, though some seek to explain their chosen variety too. There’s talk of past vintages, cellaring and sales, and the time-line carries right on up to the current crop and how it handles, and how it might mature. Some go so far as to elucidate on what the future of their region, or even the business/craft/artform in general, may hold. It’s a very thoughtful piece, well edited, and most importantly, is underpinned by a great idea.

In the end what struck me most is how unfamiliar many interviewees seemed to be at being asked, and answering, these questions. But at the conclusion of the film I am more hopeful that these questions will continue to be asked, and answered.

making

Melissa make a piece of jewellery! A brooch, in fact. She is very impressed with her efforts.

Finally some output from the new studio. Following the Helen Britton guide to brooch-backs, I’ve given this baby a double pin. For my work it’s a pretty heavy piece, so it needed it. It’s 86mm in diameter at the points.

The colouring was fun; I didn’t expect my gas-only torch to be up for the job, but I guess that’s the difference between a dedicated source of compressed gas and a multi-torch setup. I hadn’t planned a colour scheme before-hand and found that getting consistent colours was really easy, so I went up the steel-heating-spectrum and then had a play when I reached the end.

As for the texture, I tried sandblasting with the glass beads first. While they gave a lovely finish, they didn’t get rid of all the soldering muck and discolouration, so I had to go back to a heavier grit to clean up the joins. I stuck with the aluminium oxide it for the whole piece in the end, but I might try a two step process next time, since the more shiny finish did look appealing to me.

pumped

Melissa’s blast cabinet might have come down in the last shower. Meteor shower, that is.

My studio buddy thinks that my blast cabinet looks like something out of Dr Who. I’d like to disagree; it has an interesting colour scheme of shiny white and matte blue, which, while delectable looking on a cupcake, would never have made it onto tv (the shiny bit would have, I’m aware, given the many lens-flare moments I remember from some of the older series.) The thing does have, however, a clumsy un-ergonomic-ness, and rather 1970’s pre-aerodynamic-design bulk. Not to mention the above hose air hose is conspicuously connected to a regulator which is acting more as a pressure gauge, since the adjustment knob does not actually turn.

OK, so she seems to have a point. Of all the blast machines I auditioned, I get one that’s part tardis

recycle

Melissa is in the recycling game. There, she just admitted it.

Next week sees the opening of Recycle, an exhibition being curated by Penny Peckham and taking place at Synergy Gallery in Northcote, from the 3rd til the 14th of March 2010. As per the title, the works for this show are made from predominantly recycled materials, and will include a small selection of my recycled objects. It looks to be an interesting group of people involved too, if you go by this article.  Synergy Gallery is located at 253 High St, Northcote.

lost and found

Melissa loses a work in Texas. It’s a big place. And a skinny object.

I mentioned late last year that I was sending a piece to Texas for the Refined: Back to Basics exhibition. Today I was sent a link to a bunch of images taken of the opening, which took place on the 30th of January. I scrolled through the set looking for my work, and after my first pass I hadn’t seen it, which had me worried. Luckily a second look netted one shot with my work in.

Two things; in the picture a lovely Texan seems to be kneeling to worship my piece; and given that I have since managed to find at least one more image that has my work in, the little Staggered 8 Point Star really does seem dwarfed by the other works. Food for thought.