Plate Glass – Closing party!

Missed our initial afternoon tea? Well you’re in luck, it’s Tea II – Electric Boogaloo

You might remember the invitation to Plate Glass, the enamel exhibition I recently curated, from a few weeks back. Well this is an invitation to the closing party. Yes, Sally at Fancy and I enjoyed our first Afternoon Tea so much that we’re doing it again!

Join us for closing shenanigans at Fancy;
1914 2nd Avenue, Seattle

any time between 2-5pm on Saturday the 10th of March. We’ll share some more apple crumble slice and another pot of tea 😉

MJW/Schmuck week 2018

I’m not going, but about 18 of my closest steel and titanium and enamel and silver and gold friends _are_!

fuck□this□president□and□the□regime□he□rode□in□on, stainless steel, vitreous enamel, titanium. 2017

This is one of my works that will feature in the exhibition In Touch, curated by Anja Eichler and Katja Toporski, taking place in the week we like to call Munich Jewellery Week (we’re #61 on their map) beginning this Wednesday in beautiful Munich.

Our list of artists is really impressive: Anja Eichler, Catarina Hällzon, Lore Langendries, Moniek Schrijer, Anneleen Swillen, Katja Toporski, Mallory Weston, and of course me, Melissa Cameron.

The show is on at – »Verein für Originalradierung« Ludwigstrasse 7, 80539 Munich
Opening Reception: Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 5 – 9pm
Opening hours: Thu – Sat 10am – 7pm, Sun 10am – 2pm.

Please go along and say “G’day!” to Katja and Anja for me, and congratulate them on pulling this whole wonderful thing together. They’ve done an amazing job at artist-wrestling and installing. [Insert rapturous applause from Seattle.]  And if you are in Munich – and I know who some of you are already – stay warm, and have a whale of a time!

Munich Jewellery Week – In Touch

Going to Munich Jewellery Week? Schmuck? Well go see In Touch!

Munich Jewellery Week (Current Obsession, Klimt02) is almost upon us, and if you’re like me, you’ll live the action vicariously through Instagram and Twitter. But if you’re going, then have I got a show for you…!

In Touch, curated by Anja Eichler and Katja Toporski.

»Verein für Originalradierung« , Ludwigstrasse 7, 80539 Munich
Opening Reception: Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 5 – 9pm
Opening hours: Thu – Sat 10am – 7pm, Sun 10am – 2pm

(I remember this venue from last year for the courtyard that buffers it from the street, and finally getting a close-up of Carina Shoshtary‘s works.)

They already have images of most of our works up on the In Touch Facebook page if you’re keen on a sneak peek of what will be in the show. I have sent a bunch of brand new pieces never before exhibited (one, my new favourite, I finished last week), as well as a few that have had only one or two outings before, which includes an award-winning series that was recently displayed in Japan.

And if you find yourself in Munich, with your phone in hand, think of the starving eyes not in Germany, craving new images that showcase the full diversity of exhibitions and beautiful bejeweled outfits that are happening.

And air kiss Matt Lambert from me 😉

Explaining Monday – Gun Day

Why am I still ranting about guns? Explanation finally comes 16 episodes in.


There’s been a lot of news about guns in the last week. Last Tuesday I filed this article away for inclusion in today’s regular post; the Guardian reported that Remington was filing for bankruptcy, due at least in part to what they had termed “‘The Trump slump.'” A friendly administration for the gun lobby, and gun owners, has spelled radically decreased sales for gun manufacturers. But then on Wednesday, in a turn-around that would give you whiplash were you researching anything other than gun violence in the US, there was a mass shooting at a school in Florida on Valentine’s day. The cycle begins again.

My Monday – Gun Day series began on the 9th of October, 2017, a week and a day after the largest mass shooting involving a single perpetrator in US history had taken place in Las Vegas (all the modifiers are to remind us that there have been larger massacres in US history, usually racially motivated like that at Wounded Knee, or the Colfax Massacre, which was perpetrated by white Southern Democrats against about 150 black men.)

Since then, across 16 posts (including this one) made on Mondays (US Pacific time), I’ve been sharing my research about guns, and more specifically, the guns used to kill the 63 people who died in January 1st, 2017. But why? Well, firstly, some backstory that might help to explain.

I began the Monday – Gun Day series with an introduction to my work Gun from 2013/14. To design the work I replicated the AR-15 knock-off (made by Remington) used in the Sandy Hook mass shooting of 2012, into which I incorporated facts and figures I had researched about that days killings, which was, at that time, the second most deadly mass shooting perpetrated by a single person ever in the United States. I was making a series of pieces that used the tools of war to make a statement about humanity’s continuing poor relationship with itself, which I entitled The Escalation Series. My use of this gun, with all of its associations, pointed out an additional fact; the other tools of war I made pieces about were designed for, and were chiefly only accessible to, organised armies. This weapon, designed for and known as as the M-16 in the US armed forces, was and still is far too easily accessible to regular citizens of this country.

I thought after The Escalation series, in which I made jewellery pieces that depicted the following weapons of war:

fire arrow
cartridges with Minié ball bullets
Lapua Magnum shells (sniper rifle shells) from Combat Paper
multiple caltrops

as well as 3 versions of HEAT, a work (pictured below) that shows the molten metal spatter and penetration of a HEAT missile through armoured tank steel, that my association with weapons was done for a while. My focus had made a gentle pivot which saw me making mosaics out of enamelled laser cut steel, with which I could write by turns gentle, piercing and witty messages in binary.

From the series HEAT, (1 of 3) 2015
9 wall-mounted panels (565mm x 565mm – 22 3/16″ x 22 3/16″)
Stainless steel, vitreous enamel. Image Melissa Cameron.
From the series HEAT, (1 of 3) 2015
neckpiece (480mm x 480mcm – 19″ x 19″)
Stainless steel, vitreous enamel, titanium. Image Melissa Cameron.


Then two things happened. I had been recently juried into the Elizabeth R. Raphael Founder’s Prize, for which I am to make a work out of found materials, and on the 1st of October I decided to do a stock-take of all the found objects I have lying about in my study, the same day that the current most deadly mass shooting perpetrated in modern times (this seems to be accepted as anything since 1950,) by a single shooter, happened.

Having memorialised a single-person shooting before, I did not want to go down that route again. I’ve read a lot of stories about Sandy Hook, and will continue to do so the rest of my days (it’s reportage on unjustified killings of defenseless white children in a 1st world nation, and thanks to our social/political/class climate, we will find it in the media for the foreseeable future,) and it’s a lot. And I don’t want to have to repeat myself.

I have other things that horrify me just as much as 59 deaths by one person in a day. 59 deaths on any day is a pretty shit day by most of the world’s standards, and I wanted a way to make that point. So I picked a day, New Year’s Day 2017, and got to work.

We know the weapons of the mass shootings because they get so much publicity. (The Guardian already has 3 pages of articles about last week’s shooting.)  [I’m getting cynical, which I usually try to banish from my writings, but it’s almost as if the amount of publicity is inverse to the amount of action that will be taken against the problem, despite the fact that I learned in another Guardian article linked to the Trump Slump article that, “Only 22 to 31% of Americans adults say they personally own a gun.” And what they call “gun super-ownership” is actually concentrated to 3% of the population.] Anyway, digressions aside. We know so little about the other gun deaths that happen in this country because everyone is so inured by the frequency of the killings that everyday gun violence doesn’t make it to the national news. But the weapons used by the mass murderer are studied ad nauseam, so of course we learn about the guns, the shells, the alternate weapons, the victims, the scene, the police department response, the slow and painful moving on.

But what about all the the other shootings? Which guns are responsible there?

Hopefully in just a few years time the gun lobby will face a shakedown that will be compared to that experienced by the tobacco lobby, and their unconscionable actions will be pored over in as much details as the lives of those involved in the Sandy Hook massacre. For right now, I’ve learned that there are great resources for finding out who was killed, when, and where, and more loosely, how. What’s becoming clear is that there is no focus put on the gun responsible, nor its manufacturer. In any other arena, should over 30,000 people get killed by any single type of object in a year, we, the public, would cry out for all the statistics on the make, model, age and condition of the thing responsible.

Thus my research project; for each person listed as killed on the Gun Violence Archive on the 1st of January, 2017, I am finding out what make and model of gun killed them, (or my best estimation thereof,) to draw a picture of what that gun looked like.

And when I have a picture of those 63 weapons, I’m going to make a wearable piece of jewellery that incorporates every f*cking one of them.

Monday – Gun Day

Monday is the day Melissa searches for the guns that killed the first 60 people in the United States in 2017.

Another Monday, another chance for the Department of Homeland Security staff to enjoy my ‘colourful’ internet search history. (Thanks to for reminding us that all legal US immigrants are now denied the protection of the First Amendment – you know, the one about free speech.)

But lets get this protest back on track, eh?

Emory Sharod Lewis was shot at around 1am on January 1st, 2017. He was found outside Andrew’s Discount Market. Two weeks later a 19 year old suspect, Branden Prioleau, was arrested. At this stage I can’t find conviction information, so I assume he is awaiting trial. Charleston City Paper reports that Lewis was shot with a .40 caliber round. Regular readers will not be surprised to find out that the .40 caliber is a round for a semiautomatic pistol. Turns out the .40 was developed by Smith and Wesson in 1990 to go into a pistol as the FBI wanted to phase out revolvers as they were too slow to reload but wanted to keep a minimum ammunition size (= payload) to stop the intended recipient.

The .40 caliber was developed by Smith and Wesson, and as it turns out that we’re up to the S&W M&P in our sequence of alternating pistols, so allocating the Default Pistol 2 to this crime is apt.

Default Pistol 2 – S&W M&P

Luz Rosado was shot around 3:45am in Hartford, Connecticut by her friend Ulises Robles, with a “black handgun”, according to the Hartford Courant. I can’t find any details of the Robles conviction, but he was arrested after a police officer, who happened to witness the argument that preceded the shooting, chased him on foot. As for the weapon, the Ruger SR1911 (Default Pistol 1) I originally drew (true fact, I inserted in my Autocad file as a reference raster image) was a black model.

Ruger SR1911 – Default Pistol 1

This next one hurts.

Regina Hernandez, 5, was shot and killed by 34-year-old Fidel Rodriguez-Canchola after he began firing shots into the ground outside to celebrate the New Year when the girl came out and walked into the line of fire. The weapon, a .22 caliber revolver, was retrieved on the other side of a fence at the location while the suspect made his way on foot. Once found, he was charged with, “Criminally negligent homicide, a class A misdemeanor.” according to the The News Courier.

He pled guilty to that crime in February, for which he faces a maximum of 1 year in jail. Once arrested for the shooting there was trouble establishing his credentials. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) were called in and it was established that Rodriguez-Canchola is an illegal immigrant, and thus was ineligible to hold a fire-arm legally. He was then arrested for the federal crime of illegal possession of a firearm with a maximum 10 year/$250,000 penalty. (Reporting from WAFF 48, an Alabama-based NBC affiliate.) He was due to be sentenced on the federal charge, to which he also pled guilty, on October 12th, but I have found no more information about the outcome.

Ruger Single Six .22 revolver

This is gun #15. I’m a quarter of the way there.

Plate Glass – Seattle opening!

Afternoon tea at Fancy? Don’t mind if I do! Come for the plates, stay for the tea!

Nicolette Absil – Krinkled Peony Saucer, 2017

You are cordially invited to join me and Sally, staunch patron of the arts here in Seattle (and not to mention gallery owner), for afternoon tea tomorrow from 2pm. Come sip and munch delectable treats surrounded by beautiful art, in the freshly landscaped garden of delights that is Fancy, at 1914 2nd Ave, Seattle.

With exquisite treasures on show (such as the work by Nicolette Absil, pictured above and Steffi Götze, below) there will be something to surprise and impress even the most winter-weary residents of the Emerald City.

Do come!

Steffi Götze – Raum. 2017

For those who simply can’t tomorrow, the exhibition closes March 10th.

Hammer time

My work for the Artist Trust Auction, coming up later in February.

Point Line Plane brooch iv, 2013

You can touch this. If you go to the Artist Trust auction (Saturday, February 24, 2018 at the Fisher Pavilion, Seattle Center) you could even win it! The menu is up and the artist works already online look good. Just sayin…

And on now:

I am very pleased to have my work Ruchnoy Protivotankovy Granatomyot (or RPG) in this exhibition, which, as the exhibition media tells it, “drew over 1,000 submissions from 8 countries around the world. Juror Perry A. Price selected 70 works for exhibition at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center including works from 27 states in varying media including metal, wood, plastic, ceramic, fiber, glass, and mixed media.”

31st annual Materials: Hard + Soft International Contemporary Craft Competition & Exhibition
Meadows Gallery, Patterson-Appleton Arts Center
Opening Reception | Friday, February 2, 6 – 8 PM (Artist Awards at 7 PM)
February 3 – May 5, 2018

Recognized as one of the premier craft exhibitions in the country, Materials: Hard + Soft began in 1987 and was originally initiated by area artist Georgia Leach Gough. Now in its 31st year, the exhibition opens to international artists as we celebrate the evolving field of contemporary craft and the remarkable creativity and innovation of artists who push the boundaries of their chosen media.

Yep, pleased as punch!

Plate Glass – in Seattle

Plate Glass on tour – a show I curated of enamelists who each worked on a plate at my request. See it in Seattle soon.

The Plate Glass exhibition opens next Saturday in Seattle. The opening celebration is on February 10th, from 2-5pm. Our full dates are from February 8 – March 10 at Fancy, 1914 2nd Ave, Seattle.

I may have promised somewhere to speak around 3pm, but I really don’t intend to. I’ll just be chatting all afternoon. Please come say hi!

Nicolette Absil, Alicia Jane Boswell, Susan Buchanan, Kat Cole, Katie Collins, Danielle Embry, Laura Eyles, Annie Gobel, Steffi Götze, Aurelie Guillaume, Naoko Inuzuka, Kaori Juzu, Rachel Kedinger & Eleanor Anderson, Inari Kiuru, Mio Kuhnen, Zachery Lechtenberg, Camilla Luihn, Sharon Massey, Lindy McSwan, Marissa Saneholtz, Samantha Skelton, Demitra Thomloudis, Claire Townsend, Jen Townsend, Hsiao Ai Wang, Kate Wischusen and Aurelia Yeomans.

We have seven new works (yup, that’s over one quarter of the show) that did not appear at the last outing at Arrowmont, because Seattle is Special. Or, maybe it’s because our artists are so amazing that we sold a quarter of the show in its first iteration. Take your pick 😉

This week’s openings

More exhibitions open around the USA this weekend.

‘Checking the Cost of Gun Violence’ by Harriete Estel Berman.

Imagine Peace Now continues it’s journey this weekend, opening on Saturday (or tomorrow evening if you’re among the artists or invited guests) January 20 – March 16 at the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, 1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd. You can see my gun work, Resilience, there, but if you’re closer to the Metal Museum then perhaps you’d like to go see HEAT  at the Enamelist Society’s Alchemy 4 exhibition.


The opening reception for Alchemy4 at the Metal Museum will be Sunday, January 21, from 3PM-5PM. There will be a gallery talk given by the Director of Collections and Exhibitions, Grace Stewart, beginning at 4PM. The show goes from January 21 – April 29, 2018.



East Carolina University Material Topics Symposium – entitled Deconstruct/Reconstruct – is going to be a blast. See you there!

It’s taking me a few years, but I’m finally going to the annual East Carolina University Material Topics Symposium – entitled Deconstruct/Reconstruct – in January. It’s going to be amazing – the list of speakers and break-out presenter list is incredible! Am I just saying that because a bunch of my friends are going to be talking and I’m really looking forward to catching up with them all?

Of course not!

Where else are you going to see Mike Holmes reveal what he learned at Velvet da Vinci, and Andy Cooperman lecture and deliver a break-out on tool tips, or have the beautiful Matt Lambert deliver a break-out session? And then back it up with the vivacious Jina Seo and Harlan W. Butt! And this is me cherry picking – I don’t want to leave out the inimitable Judy Stone… Or Lisa Klakulak! Seriously – look at the list and the exhibitions too. And, hey, if you’re lucky, I might also have a few things to say 🙂

See y’all in Greenville.