In today’s Seattle Times

Detail image of work My House - Tanya Lippe's Lunch Box, made out of a section of Tanya's lunch box and stainless steel.
Detail image of work My House – Tanya Lippe’s Lunch Box, made out of a section of Tanya’s lunch box and stainless steel.

An article entitled: Transforming metal: ‘Metalmorphosis’ exhibit at BAM shows new possibilities by Gayle Clemans was published in the Seattle Times newspaper today. It’s a review of the Metalmorphosis exhibition at the Bellevue Arts Museum here in Seattle, and features an image of part of my installation My House: Tanya Lippe’s Lunch Box (the print version has a large reproduction of the brooch section of my piece next to the article – online it’s in a slide section, of the image included above) as well as an insightful commentary about Micki Lippe‘s work, among others.

As you might have guessed I was pretty chuffed when I found out, doubly so as the news came via an excited email from Micki this morning!

And yes, for those of you yet to see the show or not familiar with local jewellery doyenne Micki Lippe, Tanya is the name of Micki’s daughter. I’m not trying to tease with my lack of details – in fact there’s been some descriptions in Instagram of the work – but I’ve been refraining from posting full images of the installation until Micki has seen it, as due to other commitments she missed the openings at the start of the month.

Right, I’m off, to go get a copy of the newspaper 😉

Being in the world

I’ve found a couple of things:

1/ Auction for Aid – raising funds for the Refugee/Migrant Crisis

Like their About page on Facebook says, they are an “Auction For Aid – Contemporary Jewellery Auction to benefit the refugee crisis.” A bunch of UK based jewellers, (amounts are in GBP) are auctioning off some pretty great looking work on Facebook (yes, you do seem to need an account to bid) that will post/ship internationally.

Welcome to the 2016 Auction For Aid. All money raised will be going to two charities, MOAS (Migrant Offshore Aid Station) and SALAM LADC (‘Salam: LADC’ stands for ‘Peace: Lebanese Association for Development and Communication’), both charities doing wonderful work to help with the current refugee crisis.

2/ Alliages – The contemporary art jewelery agenda

Finally! An interactive calendar for jewellery events! Look out for deadline info there, and add your own to boot.

The jewelery agenda, the place you can see the contemporary art jewelery events : exhibitions, openings, lectures, awards, etc … You can propose your event to be published in the agenda by clicking in the “Add Event” blue button

Have at it, my sistren.

Imagine

The irrepressible Boris Bally has been gathering a sizable cohort together around a shared passion – the erasure of guns in this country (the United States), under the exhibition The Innovative Merger (of) Art (and) Guns (to) Inspire New Expressions (of) [or I.M.A.G.I.N.E.] PEACE NOW!!

Clunky title aside, it’s a really interesting project. Months ago he sent out disarmed firearms to metal artists all over the world, who got to work on transforming their ‘pieces’ into new works. You might have already seen the process of other artists, including Dauvit Alexander’s inspired work on Crafthaus, or perhaps the many pages of images of finished pieces up on Facebook.

Well, the next step, before the actual launch of the exhibition (those of you undecided about going to East Carolina University’s annual symposium might just have found one more reason to hitch up the trailer and head over there in January) is to create the catalogue, and for that one, we need your help.

Boris has just launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for a catalogue that will be worthy of the hundreds, nay, thousands, of artist hours that have already gone into the exhibition so far. We have a big sum in mind, but to make the kind of change that an exhibition like this has the potential of doing, the only option is to go big, or go home.

So please think about donating to this campaign, so we, as a metals community, can add our voices to those already speaking out against the violence that seems to be continuing unabated in this country, and around the world.

xx m

5 true facts!

Metalsmith Spring 2016 - featuring Hanna Hedman's glorious works
Metalsmith Spring 2016 – featuring Hanna Hedman’s glorious works

Here’s a few facts you might not know about Metalsmith – the industry publication that started for and is partially funded by the SNAG membership:

  1. You can buy digital copies online for only $5.99 (USD) and can buy it singly at news stands or news agencies.
  2. A year-long digital subscription of 5 mags is $31 (USD, or approx $43 AUD, or 28 or £21!)
  3. It features some of the best writing on jewellery in print anywhere, with regular contributions from such luminaries as Liesbeth den Besten, Andrea DiNoto and Bella Neyman. And it’s the only place where you’ll find special contributions by artists and collectors like Susie Ganch and Helen Williams Drutt English (and that’s just in Vol 35 No 5!)
  4. Metalsmith Extra has all the online content you can’t get in a print publication but expect from an online-only source, like videos by and about the artists and artisans featured in the magazine. They’re listed by issue, with folks in the newest edition featured at the top.
  5. The current issue, which features profiles on Mirjam Hiller, Vivian Beer and obviously Hanna Hedman, and a LOOK section written by Jillian Moore, is in my opinion THE BEST issue EVER produced by editor Suzanne Ramljak and her crack team of writers.*

So as my mate Molly likes to say – do yourselves a favour, yeah?

*I’m not just saying that because I’m on the editorial advisory committee, nor because even the editor described it as the “Women in Metal” issue, and you know I’m all about women and metal. Turns out it’s a bloody solid read 😉

Nadia Myre and Sheryl Oring

Nadia Myre: Indian Act, 1999-2002. Detail.

A couple of great projects I’ve seen online that I thought I’d share.

Thanks to the perfectly titled Fuck Yeah, Book Arts! site, I’ve been meditating on the beautiful beaded works orchestrated by Nadia Myre:

Nadia Myre, Indian Act

Indian Act speaks of the realities of colonization – the effects of contact, and its often-broken and untranslated contracts. The piece consists of all 56 pages of the Federal Government’s Indian Act mounted on stroud cloth and sewn over with red and white glass beads. Each word is replaced with white beads sewn into the document; the red beads replace the negative space.

Between 1999 and 2002, Nadia Myre enlisted over 230 friends, colleagues and strangers to help her bead over the Indian Act. With the help of Rhonda Meier, they organized workshops and presentations at Concordia University, and hosted weekly beading bees at Oboro Gallery, where it was presented as part of the exhibition, Cont[r]act, in 2002.

Nadia Myre: Indian Act, 1999-2002. Detail.

The piece itself is strikingly beautiful, a perfect realisation of her concept.

A fuller description of the project and her method are available at The Medicine Project website, with more (exquisitely beaded!) work and great photos of this project at her website.

Secondly, with thanks to the Creative Capital blog, I bring you the I Wish to Say project by Sheryl Oring!

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In summer 2015, a team of five typists took dictation at the Out of Site Festival in Chicago. Photo: Dhanraj Emanuel

Oring has been banding groups of volunteer typists to write postcards to politicians. She started the project with postcards to the President (of the USA, that is) and has recently moved on to the current presidential candidates, using volunteers to take dictation the same manner that she did with her first outing, dressed as a 1960’s stenographer:

In 2006, Sheryl dressed as a 1960s secretary, set up a portable public office complete with a manual typewriter in public areas across the country, and typed birthday cards to then President Bush as dictated by passers-by.

She has gone on to take in commentary of the Obama administration, and is about to start taking down community thoughts on the current lunacy presidential nomination battle.

and the effect?

I’ll never forget this guy in Chicago, at one of the last shows. He came down to where I was taking photographs and said, “I just want you to know that I am a better American because I participated in your project.”

The empowerment experienced by participants has of course been likened to therapy, which I think is a really interesting outcome of the process. Why does the act of airing your thoughts to someone who is an impartial observer give one a feeling of closure, more than, say, talking it out to a like-minded friend or relative? I also think of this project in relation to the public displays of jewellery creation and/or gifting that I have seen. I think the strength of this piece is its sustained and clearly impactful interaction, which is fostered using a rather generic and easily replicable format.

Sheryl Oring presents I Wish to Say April 26 as part of the PEN World Voices Festival at Bryant Park. You can dictate a letter to presidential candidates, or volunteer to act as a typist.

Some flight reading

Work In Progress - Nickname: Drone
Work In Progress – Nickname: Drone

Been reading about a project to create a drone-proof city on Polis, which started as, “[A] semi-ironic architectural response to drone warfare.” As a though experiment it’s really interesting, but as a cityscape – my feeling is that it can’t help but feel oppressive. On the flip side, you can have a beautiful and open city but if the state is oppressive/aggressive then the citizenry are still going to notice, and if it’s not your state that is the aggressor, perhaps it’s the only option. I’ve been studying drone warfare for a while now. Those of you on Instagram have seen the work in progress of my drone piece, which will be heading to Canberra in March. Be prepared..!

The other reading I have noted to share is courtesy of that old standard, Kit and Caboodle. I know, been a while, huh? Cate, the coordinator over there popped this on her blog; it’s about a new ‘mining’ (reclaiming) technique for gold, using acetic acid. Yup, vinegar. Awesome!

Intimate Immensities

artist Serideh Karimi
artist Serideh Karimi

I’m currently involved in a beautiful online exhibition at the new Garland Magazine. My work has been featured along a slew of other poetic works by craft artists from all over, under the theme Intimate Immensities. The exhibition was curated by Olivia PintosLopez, one of the co-creators of the magazine.

I signed up as a supporter of the first edition of the magazine and received a hand-decorated copy hard copy (of my own choosing) of the feature essay, and thus the poised tonal painting of a ballerina by Serideh Karimi that adorns my cover has been displayed proudly in my dining room at the centre of the table since its arrival.

Garland has another open call, this time with the theme of Second Home, listed on their site right now if you are interested in getting involved. The deadline for entries of this juried exhibition close on the 22nd of February. The magazine itself features thoughtful articles by many different contributors, including several by artists.

#Deadline

EIP-2016-banner

Notice this is a #deadline post..!

The Society of North American Goldsmiths magazine, Metalsmith, has an annual juried ‘Exhibition in Print’. Appearing as Issue 4 of the 5 it publishes each year, the EIP alternates between being led by a guest curator (as in Issue 4 of Volume 35 last year, which was curated by Wendy Steiner) and juried by a small and influential team, who this year consists of Eva Eisler (designer and jeweler), Lauren Fensterstock (artist  and curator) and native Seattleite, Lori Talcott (jeweler and educator).

The 2016 SNAG Juried Exhibition in Print the theme is “Shifting Sites.” (and the deadline has just been extended to Monday the 22nd of Feb!)

Now here’s a couple of insights into how at least I envisioned the Shifting Sites concept when we (the Metalsmith Advisory Committee of  last May, Suzanne Pugh, Biba Schutz, Cindi Strauss, Angela Bubash, myself and of course our fearless editor Suzanne Ramljak) came up with the central theme for this issue. I have a page of notes from our conversation, but here’s just a couple of ideas that I hope might resonate with people looking to apply to this call out:

From my perspective, as an ex-interior architect, the term site is really loaded with notions of physical space – locations, landscapes and environments. So the works might address architecture and the environment in some way – be that in an external sense, like objects that invoke or reflect the built environment, or more in terms of the body – how the site of jewellery is permanently a shifting site, or even more internally, how the wearing of a jewel may change the context of the wearer, or even that of the actual jewel as it is re-positioned or re-contextualised, in some way when in its worn state.

Another way of looking at it that we wanted to address by choosing this theme, was that of sites of production. That the shifting could be part of the craft of the object, and movement invoked in its evolution could be felt or even be expressed its final form.

The word shifting is itself a moving target, when used in its sense of evolution, change, movement or transfer, it can itself mutate. A work that speaks to any of these shifts, be they so small as to be almost imperceptible, or the opposite, big and grand gestures of transformation, are all able to come together under this banner. In fact it even covers an object that has adopted a shifting as its ‘mission in potentia’, for example when the intention that guided its creation and adoption is to help to promote a shifting site/state within the owner/user/wearer/viewer, the prime example of this being an amulet or talisman.

The diversity of meanings we hope would enable many makers to find a way to align what they do with this theme, to allow our jurors a rich and diverse array of makers to work with in piecing together the final exhibition. I hope that you might think of gathering some images of your works together to show to our jury, and I wish you luck in finding your pieces exhibited in that eternally shifting site, the Metalsmith Magazine August edition.

a kinda Deadlines addendum…

1/ I’m compelled to note here, in a whole new post, that I made some changes to the Deadlines post yesterday post initial publication. Quite a few, in fact. The reason I note that now is because if you are subscribed to a feed of this blog (email/rss) you may not have got all the deadline-y goodness that has been offered, and I’d hate my lil’ error to be the cause of that. You’ll have to visit the page to pick up the rest, but they include an internship and the potential to have a short residency at Penland over the winter, so mebbe it’s worth it..?

2/ This is not really a deadline, but I wanted to put this out / remind those folks who have seen it, that AJF Editor Ben Lignel is on the prowl for writing talent. Why not check this out? I for one think you’d be great 😉